Audublog

News and notes about birds and conservation in California

California Condor. Photo: Scott Frier/USFWS

First owlet hatched on the Audubon Starr Ranch nestcam on Feb. 21.

First egg hatches on Audubon Starr Ranch live nestcam: Last night saw the first egg hatching on the Audubon Starr Ranch live nestcam. According to Ranch Manager Pete DeSimone, this first chick should grow to full size and fledge in eight to eight-and-a-half weeks. Check out the live cam, and maybe you'll catch a glimpse.

New legislation seeks to protect California’s birds from Trump Administration rollbacks
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New legislation seeks to protect California’s birds from Trump Administration rollbacks

— Effort will give state power to maintain protections in light of administration’s gutting of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.
State official recommend endangered species protections for Tricolored Blackbird
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State official recommend endangered species protections for Tricolored Blackbird

Fish and Game Commission is likely to decide by April whether to list the rare bird under the California Endangered Species Act.

Bird strike amid the Southern California fires. Our own Janine Kraus captured this amazing photo of a window showing evidence of a bird strike during the recent fires in Ojai. The residents of this home had been evacuated and returned to find this ashy image a bird attempting to escape the fires but running into this window. No further evidence of the bird was ever found.

America's most important bird protection law is under attack

Audubon President David Yarnold writes in Newsweek about the Trump Administration's attack on the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

"The Trump administration and some members of Congress are ready to give oil and gas companies and other industries a free pass to kill birds with impunity by gutting the nation’s most effective bird protection law—a law that has been on the books for a century.

It is the law that saved some of America’s most beautiful and beloved birds from mass slaughter by a fashion industry that prized their plumes for hats and clothing in the early 1900s. At one point, an ounce of egret feathers was worth more than an ounce of gold.

Today’s industrial threat to birds isn’t the trade in fancy feathers, but rather oil pits, gas flares from drilling, oil spills, power lines, communication towers, improperly sited wind turbines and solar arrays and other deadly, but avoidable hazards."

Read more ...

Q & A with Sarah Rose
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Q & A with Sarah Rose

Our new executive director takes a moment during her busy second week to tell us a little more about herself.

Ariana Rickard at Sacramento protest against new offshore oil drilling

Audubon California's Ariana Rickard whips up the crowd during the Feb. 8 protest against new offshore oil drilling being proposed by the Trump Administration. Many Audubon activists were there to speak out against the proposal.

The Farm Bill is super important for birds

It's hard to imagine any piece of federal legislation more complex -- or more wonky -- than the Farm Bill. But as this great Audubon story suggests, there's a lot in the Farm Bill for birds. Here in California, Farm Bill helps provide habitat for birds on Central Valley farms and protect rare Tricolored Blackbirds, but that's just the beginning.

Citing multiple benefits to conservation, Audubon California strongly supports Proposition 68
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Citing multiple benefits to conservation, Audubon California strongly supports Proposition 68

— $4 billion bond measure on the June ballot will provide critical funding for parks, habitat, clean water, and the Salton Sea.

How will climate change affect grebe populations in northern California?

Courtship dance of Clark’s grebes at Clear Lake. Photo: Floyd Hayes/Redbud Audubon

This week, the Sacramento Bee published an excellent piece on how grebe populations in northern California might be impacted by climate change. The article also highlighted the grebe monitoring and outreach work of three of our chapters, Altacal, Plumas, and Redbud. For more information about our long running grebe project, please see our latest update.    

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