Audublog

News and notes about birds and conservation in California

California Condor. Photo: Scott Frier/USFWS

Crows in D

Here's the thinking behind this, according to its maker, Connor Griffith: Crow flight patterns are echoed at a thirtieth of a second to create a loopable waveform that corresponds to a tone. The waveform was measured at 27 crows across one tenth of a second. The animation plays at 12fps (2.25 seconds per 27 birds) and is 22.5 times slower than the rate of the comparable frequency. The median crow waveform was “tuned” to D4 and from there, the other crow waveforms were measured. Different wave shapes (sine, saw) were loosely based on flight pattern shape, which was a result of the speed of the crow and the angle and proximity of the crow to the camera. Got that?

Insect and disease infestation are taking a rapid and widespread toll on Southern California trees

Insect and disease infestation are hitting Southern California trees hard, says the Los Angeles Times. So hard, that it could totally remake the the natural landscape of the area.

Proposed border wall raises concerns about California birds
Audublog

Proposed border wall raises concerns about California birds

The wall's 140-mile path through California habitat will have a significant effect on threatened and endangered birds.

Tomorrow we bird, but today we march
Audublog

Tomorrow we bird, but today we march

Birders across the country take to the streets in historic March for Science.

Central Valley birds getting much-needed water for habitat
Water

Central Valley birds getting much-needed water for habitat

But even in a wet year, infrastructure issues prevent water from getting to birds in some refuges.

Audubon goes down under
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Audubon goes down under

Last month, Working Lands Project Manager, Khara Strum, spent time in southeast Australia attending the International Temperate Rice Conference to learn about rice production in Australia, share the work Audubon CA does with partners to support birds in rice in California and talk about opportunities for enhancing rice fields in Australia for birds.

A lake reappears among the birds and wildflowers of the Carrizo Plain
Water

A lake reappears among the birds and wildflowers of the Carrizo Plain

An amazing landscape comes back to life following winter rains

Tricolored Blackbirds in Sacramento County

Our own Samantha Arthur caught video of this large colony of about 3,000 Tricolored Blackbirds in Sacramento County over the past weekend. These birds are in a patch of blackberry off I-50, and the birds fly over the highway to forage in the foothill grasslands. Right now the birds are nest building and breeding. The males are singing and the colony is very active. Soon they will quiet down and incubate eggs.

Our staff is out in the field with a variety of partners looking to protect Tricolored Blackbird colonies.

We'd greatly appreciate your help.

Debi Shearwater and the Tricolored Blackbirds of San Benito County
Tricolored Blackbird

Debi Shearwater and the Tricolored Blackbirds of San Benito County

Famous birder helping to raise awareness about the plight of rare bird.

Tricolored Blackbird colonies setting up in the Central Valley

We're getting reports from our field team that at least five Tricolored Blackbird nesting colonies have been found on dairy farms so far this spring. We're working closely with the State Department of Fish and Wildife, the Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the Western Dairymen Assocation to contact the farmers and protect the nests. As we've discussed in the past, these colonies are in extreme danger when they nest on a dairy farm, because the farmers often need to harvest the field before the birds have fledged. Last year, we were able to protect every Tricolored Blackbird colony found on dairy farms, and that's our goal again this year.

How you can help, right now