Wildlife-Friendly Renewable Energy

Siting renewable energies so it is both low-carbon and sustainable for wildlife populations

Golden Eagle Photo: Nathan Rupert

Global warming is one of today’s most significant threats facing birds and people alike, and renewable energy will be a substantial part of the solution to global warming. Across the US and in California in particular, renewable energy have been rapidly developing and expanding in recent years. But with the growth of the industry must also come careful and strategic planning.

Audubon consistently advocates that new projects must be sited right. The idea behind so-called “smart siting” is that power plants and transmission lines must be located and designed using methods that avoid, minimize and mitigate impacts to the fullest extent possible. Smart-siting really follows a few simple and intuitive steps: identify and avoid important wildlife areas; within a project footprint, identify and avoid areas that will pose the greatest risk to wildlife; place power plants close to people so less transmission infrastructure is needed; and develop power plants on previously-disturbed land to protect habitat.

Audubon California and our allies have the opportunity to push renewable energy development down the right path in a state that is leading the country in setting renewable energy goals. What happens in California is being watched across the world. We can show that low-carbon energy can be developed in a way that is economical and sustainable for local wildlife and habitats.

The resources below offer a more detailed explanation of smart-siting, as well as considerations for different types of renewable energy. Further resources for Audubon chapter members can be found by visiting the Moore Charitable Foundation Energy Siting Resource Center on Audubon Works.

Renewable Energy Siting 101
Wildlife-friendly Renewable Energy

Renewable Energy Siting 101

A primer to wildlife-friendly renewable energy in California in 3 graphics

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Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan
Wildlife-friendly Renewable Energy

Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan

The plan, also known as DRECP, will protect our deserts while fighting against climate change.

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Energy Storage and the Electricity Grid
Wildlife-friendly Renewable Energy

Renewable Energy and the Electricity Grid

Our electricity grid is in need of upgrades to fully support renewable energy.

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Solar Power
Wildlife-friendly Renewable Energy

Solar Power

From rooftop panels to concentrated towers, there's more to solar than you might guess.

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Wind Power
Wildlife-friendly Renewable Energy

Wind Power

While some wind farms have earned a bad rep, wind energy can be sited to greatly minimize threats to birds.

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Geothermal Power
Wildlife-friendly Renewable Energy

Geothermal Power

The earth's energy can help fight climate and revitalize the Salton Sea area.

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News & Updates

Telling the story of birds in Kern County. Audubon California Renewable Energy Director Garry George on Thursday joined colleagues from The Nature Conservancy, Defenders of Wildlife, and the Southern Sierra Partnership to advise the Kern County Planning Commission about how to implement conservation in its upcoming General Plan process. Energy development will certainly be part of that plan, and conservation organizations are eager to ensure that the needs of wildlife and habitat are taken into account.

Feds finalize 30-year eagle kill rule

Golden Eagle in flight. Photo: USFWS/Tom Koerner

To the great disappointment of Audubon, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service earlier this month finalized a 30-year permit that will allow private and public developers in the United States, including energy companies, construction projects, and homeowners, to apply for 30-year “incidental-take permits.” These licenses absolve them of a predetermined amount of Bald Eagle deaths every year, and exempt them from being prosecuted under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act. This amounts to a six-fold increase from the existing permit duration. Species such as the Bald Eagle and Golden Eagle are normally protected by federal laws, including the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act. 

Federal renewable energy plan will safeguard bird habitat in the desert while speeding California’s renewable energy goals
Wildlife-friendly Renewable Energy

Feds release bold plan to safeguard desert birds while developing renewable energy

— "This plan proves that we don’t have to choose between wildlife protection and renewable energy,” says Brigid McCormack, executive director of Audubon California.
Renewable Energy Siting 101
Wildlife-friendly Renewable Energy

Renewable Energy Siting 101

A primer to wildlife-friendly renewable energy in California in 3 graphics

Geothermal Power
Wildlife-friendly Renewable Energy

Geothermal Power

The earth's energy can help fight climate and revitalize the Salton Sea area.

Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan
Wildlife-friendly Renewable Energy

Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan

The plan, also known as DRECP, will protect our deserts while fighting against climate change.

Wind Power
Wildlife-friendly Renewable Energy

Wind Power

While some wind farms have earned a bad rep, wind energy can be sited to greatly minimize threats to birds.

Running on sunshine
Audublog

Running on sunshine

Debs Park Center hosts solar installation and maintenance workshop

Evelyn Cormier: bird protector, climate activist and general busybody
Audublog

Evelyn Cormier: bird protector, climate activist and general busybody

At 85, Cormier has no plans to let the Altamont Pass Wind Farm off the hook anytime soon

The path from eagle endangerment to protection
Wildlife-friendly Renewable Energy

The path from eagle endangerment to protection

Duke Energy revamps bird-safety measures at Wyoming wind farm following 2013 prosecution

How you can help, right now